Assignment 2 – Seeing like your camera

Seeing like the camera sees the scene, and the ability to create images exactly how I saw them is exciting. I noticed that the eye creates a less contrasty image, while the camera’s sensor tend to exaggerate the differences between light and dark, the human eye’s dynamic range is just incredible.

For this assignment I needed to choose four different high-contrast situations and see how the camera will render these scenes, the aim is to produce higher quality images which will need less post-processing, in fact for this particular task I had to shoot in JPEG format and post the images straight out of camera without any adjustments.

Street scenes

Street scene (1 of 3)  Street scene (1 of 3) histogram

Street scene (2 of 3) Street scene (2 of 3) histogram

Street scene (3 of 3) Street scene (3 of 3) histogram

I tried to shoot with different metering modes, f stops and shutter speeds and see what happens, I kept the ISO low as it was already bright with the sun out, and used small aperture with slower shutter speed to get more details in the shadows. I usually shoot with evaluative metering mode as I like to choose the focus point, I took a picture with each of the other metering modes; spot, partial, center-weighted average as well, and I didn’t notice much difference while I kept the focus point the same. All three images turned out only a little darker in the shadows than it appeared to my eye at the time, the bright areas were pretty much spot on.

I feel like I have to experiment more of this in the future, changing the focal point (if I can) to achieve the same result. I don’t usually shoot in these harsh conditions as it’s never a flattering light on anyone but I suppose there are scenes where it works, indoor spaces for example.

Indoor spaces

Indoor space (1 of 3) Indoor space (1 of 3) histogramIndoor space (2 of 3) Indoor space (2 of 3) histogramIndoor space (3 of 3) Indoor space (3 of 3) histogram

This is pretty much the opposite to the first situation where it was overall bright with dark areas, indoors will always be darker, and having a relatively small light source such a window will make the camera struggle to get a good exposure.

I actually liked these images being so contrasty, however I tried to get as much details in the shadows as possible. The first one I found to be a little dark compare to the actual scene, I should have done that less contrasty but I’m happy with the second, and the third is a bit bright, as the focal point was on the bride, non of the metering modes did a good job determine the exposure, they pretty much looked the same.

People in shade

People in shade (1 of 3) People in shade (1 of 3) histogram

People in shade (2 of 3) People in shade (2 of 3) histogram

People in shade (3 of 3) People in shade (3 of 3) histogram

Primary focus was to expose the image correctly to the faces but of course, needed to get the overall exposure right too. I usually turn on the highlight clipping function in camera so I see if there is a part of the image overexposed but of course, I forgot this time resulting the first and second image having a tiny patch overexposed, however overall they are pretty close to what I saw on the day. The second is maybe a little dark on the face, I could have added some fill flash to brighten it up but then, it wouldn’t look as natural as it was. The best of all three is probably the last one, probably because there is no sky in the background, but the midday sun still makes the trees and pebbles bright. The bride and bridesmaids are standing under arch which just beautifully softened the harsh light.

Landscapes in low-angle incident light

Low angle light landscapes (1 of 3) Low angle light landscapes (1 of 3) histogram

Low angle light landscapes (2 of 3) Low angle light landscapes (2 of 3) histogram

Low angle light landscapes (3 of 3) Low angle light landscapes (3 of 3) histogram

Incident light is the light that falls on a subject, whether it comes from a direct or indirect source. In this case it is coming from the sun directly. The first image was the most challenging of all as the sky was just too bright, a little hazy as the see was just right behind the mountains, I was struggling to bring back the shaded areas without blowing the sky out completely, this is the closest I could get to what I saw. I could probably done it better by changing the composition allowing less sky, less bright light. The second one was a lot easier to achieve as the sun was really close to the horizon, giving contrasty landscape but well exposed sky, the last, London landscape turned out the best I think, clouds are just making the job easier for the camera.

Reflection

I think for the best result, need to avoid harsh sunlight unless that’s the look to aim for.  I prefer interesting lighting situations over low contrast, dull lighting such as an overcast day can provide. I’m not sure if I used the metering options properly with the focusing areas as non of them made magical difference, I definitely need to do more research.

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