Exercise 5. – Panning with different shutter speeds

Following movement with the camera known as panning refers to the horizontal rotation of a still camera. To avoid the unwanted motion blur, the camera could still be used on a tripod with a looser head or taken off if you have steady hands. Thinking I can do this, I’ve chosen to shoot without tripod.

On this occasion I decided to visit The Extreme Stunt Show which was just near where we live thinking the excellent opportunity for this exercise. The weather was fairly good, light conditions kept changing so I needed to try different settings and do it quickly to get a better exposure, also I needed to watch their speed and distance to adjust my shutter speed accordingly, I was quite limited on space as I was outside the barrier with the rest of the audience, it was more difficult than I thought it would be.

85 mm, f/2, 1/250, ISO 1250

85 mm, f/2, 1/250, ISO 1250

85 mm, f/4.5, 1/100, ISO 100

85 mm, f/4.5, 1/100, ISO 100

There is no motion blur on the first and the second picture, the shutter speed I’ve chosen was too high compare the speed of the cars (pardon me, monster truck) I should have chosen a very low value and probably stood back a bit as well as the subjects are filling up the whole frame giving less chance to show the motion blur.

85 mm, f/6.4, 1/80 ISO 100

85 mm, f/6.4, 1/80 ISO 100

85 mm, f/8, 1/60,  ISO 100

85 mm, f/8, 1/60, ISO 100

85 mm, f/4, 1/60, ISO 100

85 mm, f/4, 1/60, ISO 100

The next two pictures are better examples, I was pleased with the one closer to me as it shows more motion with the shutter speed of 1/80 than the other, even though I shot that a higher shutter speed than the one is much more far away from me. The car in the distance appears to be slower, I couldn’t catch more motion even with the slower shutter speed of 1/60. The image with the motorbike has taken with the same shutter speed as the car above from the same distance and there is significantly more blur… Actually I think the man in the car drove slower…or I have done a better job with the motorbike.

85 mm, f/9, 1/50, ISO 400

85 mm, f/9, 1/50, ISO 400

85 mm, f/9, 1/50, ISO 400

85 mm, f/9, 1/50, ISO 400

I managed to get a good example to demonstrate the differences in motion blur on these quad bike images. They’ve been shot with the same settings, the only thing has changed is the distance between me and the subjects. It clearly shows that if the subject is closer to me the faster it looks and more blur I get and if it’s in the distance the slower it looks and I get less of the effect.

85 mm, f/10, 1/40, ISO 400

85 mm, f/10, 1/40, ISO 400

85 mm, f/10, 1/30, ISO 500

85 mm, f/10, 1/30, ISO 500

85 mm, f/10, 1/25, ISO 500

85 mm, f/10, 1/25, ISO 500

It occurred to me that while at 1/50 of a second the subject is still sharp, from the shutter speed of 1/40 to 1/25 results blurry images overall, but the subject is still visible. I wanted to continue to stop down but unfortunately I ran out of time, the show was over. I am still pleased with the results considering this was the first time I ever done this.

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